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Theatrical Review: “Star Trek Into Darkness”

May 18, 2013 3 comments
Directed by: J.J. Abrams
Produced by: J.J. Abrams, Bryan Burk, Damon Lindelof, Alex Kurtzman, Roberto Orci
Written by: Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, Damon Lindelof
Edited by: Maryann Brandon, Mary Jo Markey
Cinematography by: Daniel Mindel
Music by: Michael Giacchino
Starring: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldaña, Benedict Cumberbatch, Karl Urban, John Cho, Alice Eve, Bruce Greenwood, Simon Pegg, Peter Weller, Anton Yelchin
Year: 2013

 

After years of anticipation, the sequel to J.J. Abrams’ bold new restart of the Star Trek film franchise is finally here. Though it was the eleventh film in the series, as the first film set in this alternate universe, it was also the franchise’s first step in an attempt to grab at a brighter future after years of the franchise taking a dive in both quality and creativity. With the promise of the series shedding years of expectations and established canon with a bit of time travel, 2009’s Star Trek brilliantly maneuvered the series into a position where it could once again surprise new audiences, Trekkies, and Trekkers alike. Read more…

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Review: “Star Trek”

April 30, 2013 4 comments
Star Trek (2009)Directed by: J.J. Abrams
Produced by: J.J. Abrams, Damon Lindelof
Written by: Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman
Edited by: Mary Jo Markey, Maryann Brandon
Cinematography by: Dan Mindel
Music by: Michael Giacchino, Alexander Courage (themes)
Starring: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldaña, Karl Urban, Eric Bana, John Cho, Simon Pegg, Anton Yelchin, Bruce Greenwood, Leonard Nimoy, Ben Cross, Clifton Collins, Jr., Winona Ryder, Chris Hemsworth, Jennifer Morrison
Year: 2009

 

It’s one of my favorite films now, but at the time this was first announced, I absolutely hated the idea of revisiting the original series characters. It wasn’t out of any sort of loyalty to the original cast, really, nor out of any sort of deep respect for their final film together, The Undiscovered Country (which contends with The Wrath of Khan for the best film), but more because I was sick of the franchise staying in the past. Other fans were seemingly of the same mind, with viewership so low for the prequel series Star Trek Enterprise that it resulted in the first Star Trek cancellation since the original series, and the abhorrently tacky Next Generation send-off Star Trek Nemesis earning the lowest box office in the series. So why was the studio and director J.J. Abrams, a self-admitted non-fan of the franchise, so keen on moving backward with the new film when stagnation was the series’ biggest problem in the first place? Read more…

Teaser Trailer: “Star Trek Into Darkness”

December 6, 2012 Leave a comment

Oooooo… Aside from the now-cliche “BWAAAAAHM”-like sounds, a la Inception, this first teaser trailer for the new Star Trek movie, Star Trek Into Darkness, looks quite awesome (as all teaser trailers aim to be, ’cause they don’t show much plot).

What can we tell about the new movie from this trailer? Well, how about the fact that it looks to be very earthbound — or, at the very least, a planet with a large humanoid population… but most likely Earth. More evidence to this fact is that we also see what is most likely the Enterprise rising up from a large body of water. How crazy is that?!

Star Trek Into DarknessThe still-unnamed villain, played by Benedict Cumberbatch, is obviously holding a grudge against someone, though whether it’s Starfleet in general, someone on the Enterprise crew, or some combination of the two is obviously not revealed in this brief trailer. And, frankly, I hope it’s the first one, at least initially, ’cause if it’s too much of a personal grudge, at least initially, too many parallels could possibly be drawn between this film and Wrath of Khan.

Speaking of which, we also get to see Kirk fighting someone who possibly has some sort of superhuman strength, based on the fact that he’s leaping through the air and swinging around a very large, heavy-looking weapon. Could Cumberbatch and/or his henchmen be genetically enhanced, like Khan? Or has he encountered some anomaly that has caused these enhancements, like Gary Mitchell in the original series episode “Where No Man Has Gone Before”? I hope it’s someone original, but I wouldn’t mind a few nods and references to either character, either. Gary Mitchell already featured in the comic tie-in series to J.J. Abrams’ films, and so that would be kind of redundant anyway and would suck for the comic creators, being written out of canon so fast and so definitively.

And, finally, who’s the blonde girl being played by Alice Eve who we only see fleeting glimpses of? A few possibilities exist in some original characters that haven’t yet been introduced to the Abrams films: Yeoman Janice Rand is one possibility. Given the blue uniform, however, my guess is that it’s Nurse Christine Chapel, a character originally played by Gene Roddenbarry’s wife, Majel Barrett and mentioned off screen in the first film.

Of course, we’ll probably get no official answers until the movie comes out, as it should be. But it’s fun to speculate, all the same! And in case you didn’t get enough of the trailer, why not watch this Japanese version, which has an extra bit of nostalgia at the end that will be familiar to many Trek fans:

2011 in Review: My 10 Favorite Films, 7 – 4

January 23, 2012 4 comments

<<  2011 in Review: My Favorite Films, 10 – 8

Now we come to a portion of the list that, by pure coincidence, I am dubbing the nerdiest portion of my list. Three comic book films and a semi-obscure sci-fi film from a director who did an even more obscure sci-fi film with Sam Rockwell a few years ago.

This was the final year in which we got pre-Avengers films for the last two superheroes who would be getting them (with Hawkeye and Black Widow likely to be given their own post-Avengers films after that is an undoubtable success), and it was also the year that superhero films began to experiment with formulas, styles, and audience taste.

The three comic book films here largely exemplify what studios need to strive for in order to keep this genre alive and interesting, while the other film, the more obscure film, is itself a great example of using a familiar genre and its tropes to catapult a film into a touching and yet still intriguing human story.

7.  Thor (May 6)

When The Avengers were slated to get their film debut sometime in the future, I doubt anyone could have thought that this film would be any good, let alone be better than either of the Hulk’s two major film adaptations (though I did still pretty much like 2008’s take). While nobody really balked at the thought of adapting the story of a radioactive scientist who, you know, hulks out when he gets angry into an entertaining film (likely thanks to that character’s familiarity to audiences through various smaller mediums, especially the Bill Bixby/Lou Ferrigno 70s TV series), somehow the story of the tortured dichotomy of Bruce Banner and the Hulk comes off as far more believable and, more importantly, relatable on a metaphorical level than Thor — a being who, depending on what version you go with, is either from a parallel dimension who inspired the Norse god of thunder or, more classically, actually is the god of thunder himself. Read more…

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